Highlights from the EAN in Amsterdam

Posted in Courses & Conferences on 29th Jun 2017

 

Tuesday June 27th

Apomorphine infusion effective in Parkinson’s – Metabolic syndrome increases risk of cognitive disorders – Openness may play a protective role in the co-occurrence of migraine and depression – Europe’s neurologists exceptionally scientifically productive – Heavy smart phone use can damage arm nerves – Statins not associated with increased polyneuropathy risk.

Apomorphine infusion effective in treating motor fluctuations of Parkinson’s

Apomorphine subcutaneous infusion is an effective treatment for Parkinson patients whose motor fluctuations are poorly controlled by conventional therapies. This was shown by the large-scale TOLEDO study presented at the congress.

Full article –> link

Metabolic syndrome increases risk of cognitive disorders

A study presented at the congress has shown that obesity alone is not a risk factor for cognitive disorders, but commonly associated co-morbidities such as diabetes, high blood pressure and metabolic disorders are. Dementia diseases in patients who suffer from diabetes are often treated inadequately, a new research paper reveals. 

Full article –> link

Openness may play a protective role in the co-occurrence of migraine and depression

People with depression and neuroticism are particularly susceptible to migraine. This was shown in a current Hungarian/UK study presented at the congress. Openness to new experiences, on the other hand, may reduce the risk of developing migraine in people with history of depression. 

Full article –> link

High “gross neurological product”: Europe’s neurologists exceptionally scientifically productive
European neurology is a highly productive discipline both in terms of quantity and quality – with continuous growth over the years. This is the result of an analysis of scientific publication presented at the congress.

Full article –> link

Heavy smart phone use can damage arm nerves

Heavy users of smart phones tap on the touchscreen of their mobile phones more than 5,000 times a day. A study presented at the congress shows that these finger acrobatics can put a major strain on the nerves of the hand and arm. If the worst come to the worst, heavy users can develop carpal tunnel syndrome.

Full article –> link

Statins not associated with increased polyneuropathy risk, Danish study says

It was long debated whether cholesterol-lowering statins can be conducive to the occurrence of neuropathies. A study presented at the congress now issues an all-clear signal: Patients treated with statins were not at greater risk of developing polyneuropathy than others. 

Full article –> link

Monday June 26th

Epilepsy: innovative substances and interventions – Guillain-Barré syndrome: risk influenced by month of birth – New antibody helps migraine patients who overuse medication

Epilepsy: innovative substances and interventions fly in the face of therapy resistance
Numerous new medicines now deliver effective help for epilepsy patients. However, up to a third of patients do not respond to the available therapies sufficiently, if at all. A group of new substances including cannabinoids and neurosteroids were presented at the congress as a possible answer in the search for suitable treatments for severe, therapy-resistant forms of epilepsy. Less invasive neurosurgery techniques and the use of radiotherapies also provide new therapeutic options. 
Full article –> link

Guillain-Barré syndrome: risk of developing disorder influenced by month of birth
October babies are more likely to develop Guillain-Barré syndrome, while fewer sufferers are born in June. This was the conclusion drawn by a Serbian, Bosnian and Montenegrin study.
Full article –> link

New antibody helps migraine patients who overuse medication
A new human antibody may soon become available as a specific medication for preventing frequent migraine attacks. As confirmed by an international team of researchers at the congress, there is a way to reduce the number of days that patients with medication overuse suffer from migraine headaches, as well as the quantity of medication for the treatment of acute migraine attacks they take.
Full article –> link

Sunday June 25th

Outcomes measurements ever more important – Autoantibodies: new treatment options and challenges – Palliative neurology: early start, multidisciplinary approach  – Hypertension associated with more serious forms of Parkinson’s.

Neurology congress in Amsterdam: Outcomes measurements are becoming ever more important 
How effective is a treatment, does it lead to the expected improvement and how can all this be measured in an objective manner? Outcomes measurements are increasingly important in neurology. Participants at the congress discussed latest development in the field of outcomes research and how patients benefit from these activities.
Full article –> link

Autoantibodies: new treatment options and challenges in neurology
Autoantibodies are increasingly being identified as the cause of nervous-system diseases. At the congress, Prof Angela Vincent spoke about the new treatment options emerging as a result and the degree to which screening makes sense, as well as the latest research findings.
Full article –> link

Palliative neurology: early start, multidisciplinary approach
Palliative medicine goes far beyond the treatment of people suffering from terminal cancer. It is precisely patients with incurable neurological diseases who can benefit enormously from early multidisciplinary palliative care. These views were expressed by experts at the congress.
Full article –> link

Hypertension associated with more serious forms of Parkinson’s
British and Italian scientists presented an important contribution to research on Parkinson’s disease. They managed to provide evidence that patients with hypertension are struck more seriously by Parkinson’s disease than patients with normal blood pressure. The hope is that optimum blood pressure management might help to mitigate the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.
Full article –> link

Saturday June 24th

Neurological diseases on the rise – Parkinson’s disease: early detection crucial – Cannabinoids suitable for migraine prevention – Sleep deprivation and disruption harm mind and body – Stroke research: almost three times as many patients could be disability-free.

Neurological diseases on the rise: European collaboration in research essential
EU resources are the top source of funding for cross-border collaboration in neurological research. Prof Günther Deuschl, President of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN) expressed concern about tendencies toward Europe skepticism: “It is only together that we can handle the growing challenges in research.” More than 220 million people in Europe suffer from neurological diseases such as Alzheimer, dementia or headaches and that number is growing all the time.
Full article –> link

Parkinson’s disease: early detection crucial, new therapy approaches on the horizon
Detecting Parkinson’s disease before non-reversible symptoms occur: New approaches to early detection are meant to ensure just that. They are based on detection of alpha-synuclein in the skin or intestines. New therapy approaches such as a potential “vaccination” could improve the prognosis of affected individuals in future. Prof Günther Deuschl, President of the European Academy of Neurology (EAN), summarised the latest findings in research on Parkinson’s’ disease.
Full article –> link

Cannabinoids suitable for migraine prevention
A study confirmed that cannabinoids are just as suitable as a prophylaxis for migraine attacks as other pharmaceutical treatments. Interestingly though, when it comes to treating acute cluster headaches they are only effective in patients that suffered from migraine in childhood.
Full article –> link

Sleep deprivation and disruption harm mind and body
A chronic lack of sleep not only impairs cognitive abilities but also increases the risk of heart disease and diabetes. Current research discussed at the congress show that not only the amount of sleep is important but also whether it is taken at the right time.
Full article –> link

Stroke research: almost three times as many patients could be disability-free in future
Virtually no other disease has seen such massive strides in treatment in recent years as stroke. Recent studies have confirmed that it is still possible to mechanically remove large vessel occlusions in the brain many hours after a stroke occurs. Experts expressed optimism that the proportion of patients with lives free of serious disability after a major stroke could be increased by 270 percent.
Full article –> link

 

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